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. and he is, at this time, in hawaii, the greatest leader. he served his country as a soldier, receiving the -- highest honor our nation can be so. when we think of how he began to serve his nation, it was difficult to believe the difficulty in hawaii as japanese americans to be a part of our nation's military, they were denied, they were considered aliens of this country. but he was one of those that wanted to serve his country and they went to the highest level to receive, to receive the dignity, and eventually they were given the honor to serve our country and as we now know, they became the greatest unit in military history with the most decorations of any unit and also with the highest level of decoration of the medal of honor. he served as a leader, the third longest serving member of the u.s. senate in our nation's history. he served as a defender of people of this country, championing his charges for civil-rights including the equal rights of women, asian americans, african-americans, native hawaiians. it is an incredible understatement to call him an institution, but this chambe
's longest-serving and finest senators. an iconic political figure of his beloved hawaii and the only original member of a congressional delegation still serving in congress, he was a man who had every reason to call attention to himself but who never did. he was the kind of man, in short, that america has always been grateful to have. especially in her darkest hours, men who lead by example and who expect nothing in return. mr. reid: mr. president, i -- the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: yes, i didn't mention -- i should have, but i'm really -- have been waiting the last hour or so to make sure that it was okay with his wife that i came here and said something, so i haven't had time to do much other than feel bad about senator inouye. as i indicated, i talked to irene. i wasn't able to talk to ken, but i did talk to irene. i want to make sure that everyone understands the depth of my feelings -- i'm speaking for the entire senate. he believed in me more than i believed in myself, many, many years ago, a couple decades ago, he said, you know, you're going to do grea
of hawaii. in and our defense secretary leon panetta at the national press club on defense policy and spending. the senate is in session at 9:30 eastern. members will continue consideration of a bill that will help the victims of hurricane sandy. the senate banking subcommittee on financial institutions is holding a hearing this morning on consumer credit reports. witnesses will include representative of the consumer protection bureau, about oversight of the credit reporting market. you can see that live on c-span3 and noon eastern. >> one of the things that did surprise me a little, i didn't conduct a nationwide survey but among people with long guns that i talked with high found very often the reaction, your way of thinking before and after you get a gun is very different. i think any law-abiding gun owners realizes when he has a gun, he or she, it is a huge responsibility. if you use this weapon irresponsibly or wrongly you could get yourself in legal trouble, you could cause unnecessary death, you did not intend to harm to, makes you very careful. it should make you very caref
opponents wrong. thanks to daniel inouye, hawaii has become a modern, prosperous state. many alaskans have a special fond unless for the 50th state, especially i have to say at this time of the year when it's 40 below in fairbanks. daniel inouye began his public career and service at the age of 17 when he entered the army after the attack on pearl harbor. he served with incredible distinction, earning the nation's highest military medal for action in italy. as a member of the senate, senator inouye continued his fierce defense of his state in his partnership with alaska. my preye predecessor, ted steve, knew senator inouye as his brother. they worked together and produced much good for both our states. that will last for generations. when i was elected to this office, senator inouye was one of the first members to reach out to me to ask how he could help. the unique thing about senator inouye was always his quiet approach to all the issues. he provided me quiet advice and helped me learn how this place works. many times i'd be down here at the podium and in the well here waiting for the vo
. inouye of hawaii. even noe now his desk sits draped in black and his chair with a lei flown in from his home state of hawaii and all of us this week have known and felt the change in this chamber. the senate has lost a giant, and america has lost a hero. danny inouye was truly a great man, and i feel blessed in my short time here, my two years, to have been -- had the opportunity to sit with him over a private lunch, to joke with him occasionally in the anti-room, to learn something of his spirit and his personality. he had such a big heart and such a wonderfully gracious spirit. most of the senators i've had the honor to come to know in these two years, i only knew as a great distance as a local elected official, at someone as a business community at home in delaware. and, frankly, when i asked senator inouye to lunch, i was intimidated. as a congressional medal of honor winner, as a giant of the senate, the chairman of the appropriations committee and the president pro tempore of this senate, i, frankly, trembled to sit with him at a lunch and was delighted to discover a person so app
in the case of dan, hawaii, in the case of ted, alaska, and in both of their cases, the country, ahead of any kind of partisan squabbling. danny inouye lived a full and remarkable life. we will miss him dearly. he was proud of his japanese heritage, proud of his roots, proud of his service as a champion of veterans and veterans' rights. he loved our troops. it is fitting that a building at the walter reed army institute of research now bears his name. i often marveled at how hard he fought to regain his health in the face of mounting odds. he died with no regrets. aloha was his last word. hawaii misses daniel inouye, america misses him, and our thoughts are with his wife irene and his son daniel ken jr. who was a great friend of my stepson johnny heinz. and also the rest of his family at this difficult time. i yield the floor. mr. mcconnell: mr. president, are we in a quorum call? the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: mr. president, i rise to pay tribute to senator kay bailey hutchison who will be retiring at the end of the year. senator hutchison has been a dear friend
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
of the senate and the state of hawaii as long as history is written. his place in the history books will not fade. as the second-longest serving senator in our history, senator inouye's career in congress spanned the life of hawaii's statehood, elected to the senate in 1962. only robert byrd served longer. senator inouye's tradition of service began long before he came to the united states senate. he was working as a medical volunteer when japanese warplanes attacked pearl harbor. he was just a boy, a teenager. from the time he was just a kid, he wanted to be a doctor, a medical doctor, but a different fate awaited dan inouye. after the attack, as we all know too well, japanese americans were deemed enemy aliens and were therefore not subject to the draft. in spite of that, in spite of the humiliation, more than 110,000 people of japanese ancestry were imprisoned in american internment camps. i have seen the pictures, we have heard the stories. they were in prison. yet dan inouye and other japanese americans, in spite of the unfair designation of being an enemy alien, volunteered to
senators. an iconic political figure of his beloved hawaii, and the onlt original member of the congressional delegation who isn still serving in congress. he was a man who had every reason to call attention to himself. but who never did. man he was the kind of man, in short, that america has always been grateful tocially have.kest especially in our darkest hours. etn who lead by example. r those who expect nothing. nothing in return.es, i >> mr. president, i didn't thetion, i should have, but i am really -- i have been waiting last hour to make sure that it was okay with his wife that i said something. i haven't had time to do much bd other than feel bad. to as i talked to irene, i did talk to her. but i want to make sure that everyone understands the depth of my feelings. i'm speaking for the entire senate. m he believed in me more than iany believed in myself. many years ago, a couple of decades y ago.nate, aays he said that you're going to do great things in the senate. he always talked about my leaving the senate, and heh, always said that i did the right thing by te
. >> senator daniel of hawaii given a rare honor of lying in state in the capitol rue tun da today. he died sunday in an area hospital. he's the second longest serving senator in u.s. history. after the arrival at the capital, congressional leaders and vice president biden spoke at a memorial for senator inouye. [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] [background sounds] >>> let us pray. gracious god, sovereign lord of history, thank you for the exemplary impact of senator daniel ken inouye on our national history. lord, we're grateful for the excellence that distinguished his significant career, for the quiet grace and dignity with which he represented the ahoha state and gift of ennernment that enabled him to serve you faithfully for the good of america.
brian schatz, the lieutenant governor of the state of hawaii, and that letter is a resignation letter. i ask unanimous consent that the senator-designee schatz resignation letter be printed in the record. the president pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. it will be printed in the record. the vice president: the chair liz before the senate a certificate of appointment to fill a vacancy presented by the death of the late senator daniel inouye of hawaii. the certificate, the chair is advised is in a form suggested by the senate. if there is no objection, the reading of the certificate will be waived and it will be printed in full in the record. if the senator-designee will submit himself to the desk the chair will administer the oath of office. the vice president : do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that i will bear true faith and that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and t
at the memorial services for the late hawaii senator daniel inouye today at the washington national cathedral in washington d.c. senator inouye died on monday at the age of 88 and was the second longest-serving senator in history. this is an hour and 45 minutes. .. >> i am resurrection and i am white said the lord. whoever has faith in me shall have lies, and everyone who has lies and has committed himself to me and she shall not die forever. as for me, i know that my redeemer lives and that at the last he will send upon the earth after my awakening, he will raise me up and in my body, i shall see god. i myself shall see in my eyes behold him who is my friend and not a stranger. for none of us have wife and hands of a none terms his own master when we die. for if we have life, we are alive in the lord and if we die, we die in the lord. so then, whether we live or die, we are the worse possession. happy from now on are those who died in the lord, so it is said we spirit, for they rest from their labor. >> as dean of washington national cathedral on behalf of the bishop of washington, i will co
was a freshman at the university of hawaii. >> host: i apologize. take it one step back. how did she get to hawaii? >> guest: her father, who had been a furniture salesman in mercer island, or in seattle, washington, he got a job selling furniture in honolulu. he was always looking over the next thing. moving west. he moved from kansas, california, spent time and seattle, seattle to hawaii. so she came along as a family. she was only 17 when she graduated from high school, and excellent public school in suburban seattle. her name is stanley and. his name was stanley. barack obama had been there since 1969. also an undergraduate even though he was much older. and they both happen to sign up for a beginning russian class. this was during right after sputnik and the schools all of the country are starting to teach russian. it was the most important thing public schools could do, prepare the u.s. for the cold war. so they both ended up in a russian class and that's what the met. >> host: how long do they know each other before they got married? >> guest: they knew each other for five months.
there where a memorial service is going to be held shortly for the late hawaii senator danielle inouye. daniel inouye. president obama, vice president biden and veterans affairs secretary shinseki are kennelinged to pay tribute. -- scheduled to pay tribute. rear admiral barry black scheduled to perform the sermon. following a memorial service for members of congress, we see senator dick durbin on your screen. the senator died of respiratory complications mold, he was 88 years old. senator inouye returns home the hawaii on saturday. a public service will be held at the national memorial cemetery of the pacific on sunday before he's laid to rest in his home state. we're going to watch and listen now, live coverage on c-span2. ♪ ♪ [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [inaudible conversations] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ muck. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ muck. ♪
indignation at comic and akamai hawaii, new york and chicago. david maraniss spoke with relatives and discovered the president's african ancestral history. he toured houses were young barack obama lifted into a shot and found a kansas family homes in neighbor's mother family began. and for the next two hours and david maraniss discusses his latest book "barack obama: the story." and then take your calls e-mails and treat. >> host: david maraniss, you write in "barack obama" but no product could be more the product of randomness than that of barack obama. >> guest: is the whole world coming together and hung on the lulu, who happens to come there from kenya because he reads the story and this is a great place because of its diversity and a mother who can't say because she is a father who has his wanderlust and is never satisfied and set up and a class and here comes barack obama who emerges as a whole global random access into his own until he becomes president he becomes president of the united states. >> host: braid
. his mother, his mother, the first of her generation in hawaii, his father an Émigre from japan. at a time when there was strong and prejudices still in existence in america, a man who came of age as the secondary burst upon the scene, and that very prejudiced against japanese-americans reached a crescendo. december 7, 1942, as the majority leader alluded to, on the way to mass, or on the way to church with her grandfather listening to your radio about the bombing that was taking place in pearl harbor. first as danny told the story, over several times, he thought it was the most -- he and his father drove, he could see, could see pearl harbor, the bombs bursting. he was then labeled and any alien. he was labeled an enemy alien as his family was. because of his japanese ancest ancestry. but he thought for the chance to fight for his country. he had to fight for the chance to fight for his country. not just to prove that he was a loyal american but because, because he knew, he knew what was at stake because it was the right thing to do. my mom was always taught my colleagues be fo
the junior senator from hawaii, daniel akaka, as he retires from a life indicated to his -- dedicated to his community and country. when he graduated from high school and the war was ongoing, and of course people were watching hawaii very closely because they had such a huge asian population, a huge japanese and american population, so it was watched very, very closely, and for reasons that really weren't valid, but that's what we did then. so he spent, daniel akaka spent two years as a civilian worker with the united states army corps of engineers and two years of active duty in the u.s. army. what his duties were basically, as i recall having talked to dan akaka, is they were there to protect the water in honolulu. after the war, dan used the original tkpwufplt bill. years -- tkpweuplt -- g.i. bill. years later he would get his masters bill. senator akaka believed he would not have gotten his master if not for the benefits he received. he has worked to make important improvements to the 21st century g.i. bill of rights, today's bill is modeled after the work done by jim webb after the educ
. akaka: madam president? the presiding officer: the the senator from hawaii. mr. akaka: madam president, i rise to give me remarks and my aloha to the united states senate. madam president, before i begin, i want to say that my good friend, my colleague of 36 years, my brother dan inouye, hawaii's senior senator, i wish him a speedy recovery and return to the senate. mr. president, i -- i mean, madam president, i rise today to say aloha to this institution. i have been honored to be a member of the united states senate for 22 years. it has been an incredible journey that i never imagined. as a senior in high school going to kamemha school for boys, which was noted as a military school, my life was changed for school. when i saw japanese fighter planes attacking pearl harbor. like most men in my generation, i joined the war effort. my path was forever altered. when the war ended, i believe i was suffering from ptsd. it was an act of congress that allowed me and the veterans of my generation, to build successful new kind of lives. congress passed the g.i. bill and i say with certainty tha
about the senator from hawaii, mr. inouye. mr. blunt: we were at the service this morning in the rotunda of the capitol where only 31 americans in the history of the country have been honored by that opportunity for americans to think about them as they lay in the center of the capitol on the catapult that was used -- ca -- catafalk that wasd by president lincoln and others. i was able to place the wreath at the capitol when rosa parks was in that same place, and i just want to say, madam president, how honored i was to get to serve in the senate with mr. inouye. he really not only was a hero in so many ways but i think connected all of us to the greatest generation, as tom brokaw titled that generation, and there was no better example of that quiet, purposeful, heroic dedication to service than the senator from hawaii, the president pro tempore, the chairman of the appropriation committees, but most of all just the great american. last year when school was out, my -- my youngest son charlie was here for lunch and -- in the senate dining room. he saw mr. inouye, and he had seen ken byrne
, washington, oregon, california, hawaii has been threatened by hundreds of thousands of tons of debris washing ashore from the tragic tsunami in japan nearly two years ago. that's why this legislation asks noaa to take a closer look at the tsunami debris and make sure we are putting an accurate assessment and risk in place to protect the west coast. if they decide that it is a severe marine debris event, then they will need to present a specific coordination plan developed to meet that threat and work with local governments, counties and tribes and to make sure that there is a coordinated effort to protect our economy and environment from tsunami debris. we know in the northwest because we have already seen ships, we have seen bridges, we have seen various parts float ashore, oftentimes local communities having to share the burden and expense of cleaning up the tsunami debris. with over 165,000 jobs and nearly $11 billion in our coastal economy from fishing to tourism to various activities, we want to make sure that tsunami debris does not hurt our coastal economies. all you need to do is ask
looking forward to going to hawaii with my brother in february. i will get a lot of use out of it. my old luggage was in the basement and it got wet and i needed to get rid of it. i have been looking and i turned on the tv and there it was. >>guest: it was guided. you do not even know until get this home how much you are getting. how much you can put itin it. you saw the commuter garment bag the roll-up beauty case is in here. let me find the red one. >>host: you will be traveling in style ester. >>guest: you can even put your jewelry in this. >>caller: i am so excited. >>guest: by the way 10 years warranty. 6 c13 and, earned the good housekeeping seal. i want to show you because it looks so rich, one finger.my gosh, beautiful. not here to touch and feel it we are trying to get you to know how glamorous yet lightweight endurable at the same time. >>caller: can i see the inside of one? >>guest: let me open the brown. you really did just to an end and said i had to have it. >>caller: right. i ordered it right away. >>guest: --2 in. i want you to see this because itnce. you
. this is big gym. big jim goes out to hawaii to break up a communist spy ring mostly made up of doctors in hawaii. in the end what he does is he finds where these guys are having a meeting and rushes into the meeting and beat the communists up using his fists in a big fight and what transpires is he follows the story are, they went back, testified and got off and he starts to say something along the lines that may be the constitution isn't all that great. maybe these congressional committees are now the right thing to do. maybe we should just bareknuckle it with communist. we need to have a few more fistfights and less congressional committees investigating and that style of politics, that gruff macho style in fighting the cold war that wayne personified explicitly, mccarthy in numerous ways, that richard nixon tries to take up and make a part of his own view of the cold war and in fact during when the first scandal breaks that richard nixon is getting money from these wealthy businessmen to fund his campaign, one of the first things richard nixon does is he said it is a communist plot.
president bill clinton spoke at the memorial services for the late hawaii senator, daniel inouye today at the washington national cathedral in washington, dc. senator inouye died on monday at the age of 88 and was the second longest serving senator in history. this is an hour and 45 minutes. ♪ [inaudible] ♪ >> i am resurrection and i am life, says the lord. whoever has faith in me shall have life, even though he died. and everyone who has life and has committed himself to me in faith, shall not die forever. as for me, i know that my redeemer lives. and that at the last he will stand upon the earth, after my awakening he will raise me up and in my body i shall see god. i, myself, shall see and my buys behold him who is my friend, and not a stranger. for up in of us has life in himself and none becomes his own master when we die. for if we have life, we are alive in the lord, and if we die, we die in the lord. so, then, whether we live or die, we are the lord's possessions. happy from now on are those who die in the lord. so it is said the spirit, for they rest from their labors. ...
. it was all part of the image thing, not just of him, but generally in hawaii, where in my mind there was some kind of line between sophisticated detachment and just slacker lately. and he exuded the sophisticated detachment. he has his act together in a way. he understood how things work, maybe a little better than the rest of us. >> guest: you know, that was when he was 15 or 16 years old. and you can see some of those characteristics today in his presidency. there are a lot of reasons for that detachment. part of it has to do with hawaii. he was a native hawaiian and you just keep cool. no matter what else is going on. he had not come ridership with his buddies. best of all, you know, just being cool. it was part of his formative years. he has always had that nature. another aspect is more developed and related, i would say, or politics, which is in this country and all of its racial dynamics and explosiveness, a black person was discussed as being very cool. >> host: how much pot smoking did the president do? >> guest: well, there aren't are particulars. you know, the whole notion of bill
on the island of oahu and hawaii. at 7:53 on sunday morning, 1941 without warning, the japanese launched a massive air attack against pearl harbor and other military bases on the island. when the attack ended, almost 3000 americans have lost their lives. a total of 21 ships were demolished, and 188 aircraft were destroyed. most of those aircraft were destroyed before they could become airborne. after the attack, president franklin delano roosevelt stated that this day, december 7, is the day which will live in infamy. and it has. we gather to remember that attack on pearl harbor, and honor those who received the blow of that first strike. and also remember and honor all those who served in world war ii. it's my pleasure today to represent the friends of the national world war ii memorial, an organization that is dedicated to ensuring that we always remember the greatest generation and their service, valor and sacrifice. and all those who served on the homefront. to achieve this we worked very closely and proudly with the national park service, and with the department of defense to bring
act, which lasted from ferdinand magellan's to james cook's death in hawaii that is from 1519 to 1779. they so in fear. it was reasonable for them to be fearful given the dangers of such a voyage in the the age of sail which mortality rates hoovered in the 80th percentile. a lot of people tried to go around the world. the world simply slugged most of them off. the. ed in the initial phase the alongest death prevailed and fear was the response. for from the 1780s until the 19 250eus travelers who made their way around the world did so with a striking confidence that they could survive the experience. western society had generated technology and political networks that seemed to have conquered the globe. at this point, it was not only possible to go around the world. it had become a poplar past time. representation of doing a circumnavigation became playful, entizing -- enticing even joy us. there were costs. not all of them hidden. there seemed to be hidden glories making an swing around the planet. over the 20th century and now to the 21st century. the confidence has given way to doub
fastic name. it's like tom wolf. perfectly portrays hawaii, you know, nature. he's the fine -- mid 19th merge has to offer he has essentially financial resources in the darings when table could involve cash as well as anything else you imagine. that doesn't happen. of course not. enormous advantages. he's been to many conventions. he dominated most. he goes there in fact sue ward was not the republican nominee in 1856 they told him there was no way we were winning. you don't want to be the leader of losing cost. let's wait four years and we'll win. he read the politics right. lincoln's campaign manager david davis just to put this speft davis has never been to a republican national convention. you have the veteran the bested in the business against a guy who has never been to a convention. davis went in and the one advantage that he doesn't know about he knows lincoln is going to be player. he know it's the midwest and it's a hometown. he knows that chase is going have the ohio delegateds the delegates from ohio support chase on the floor of the convention on the first ballot only. let'
of separation of powers. he previously taught at harvard, stanford, hawaii and american university law school spirit he is a member of the american academy of fellow lawyers, and was the president from 1999 until 2000. he is a graduate of the yell university and harvard law school, served his commission as officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome dean alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you, roger. i also have the distinction of two things. one, i read and commented on the book, i don't want to get any medal of honor for that. nobody has come after me out. you should've read the draft that i wrote. [laughter] second, i am one of the few who practices regularly before the supreme court that did not file for the fisher v. university of texas case. [laughter] let's remember that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and on about affirmative action. the question is university of texas, did it violate the equal protection clause in connection with the undergraduate admissions program, ended abigail fisher, which he injured by what the university of texas did.
-year-old danny inouye saw the japanese planes over his hawaii home, on december 7, 1941, his first impulse was to help so he ran to help. he had emergency medical training and so he used that training to help bind the wounds of the americans injured in the attack on pearl harbor. his second impulse, just as strong, was to defend our country. but the america of 1941 did not want his service. in fact, it considered danny and his fellow japanese americans suspect and called them enemy aliens. and confined more than 100,000 of them to internment camps. when danny inouye tried to enlist to defend his country, his country told him you are not welcome. but danny inouye did not allow anger and resentment to overcome his love of country says something remarkable about him and about our country. when in 1943 president roosevelt allowed japanese americans to enlist in the fight against nazi germany, inouye and thousands of young men answered the call. he burned with desire to defend the nation that had told him and people of his background -- quote -- "you may not serve." a nation that still
for the people of hawaii, every single day that he lived, in public service. his love of the state and every hawaiian was so abundantly clear through his massive list of accomplishments, overwhelming list of accomplishments, since hawaii became a state, dan had been working for it as the first congressman ever elected by that state, and only the third senator, and his efforts are clear in his state's roads, bridges, airports, schools, military bases, health care, oceans and almost every aspect of american life that reached to the islands. he played a truly momentous role in making hawaii what it is today. dan and i worked together on the commerce committee for 27 years. i was always -- felt very close to him, i remember sitting with him quietly, maybe sharing a joke when i was lucky enough to be sitting beside him. but most often just listening. he was thinking, waiting for discussion to ripen. he never once spoke just for the sake of it. yet when he did speak, watch out. i watched him a number of times, which i could well recite, when he took an argument that the commerce committee had let
.50$20.50 for the last one. that $180. the hawaii individually is $35. >>host: why? >>guest: i do not know that is it sells for. supply and demand. how about you are going to get the 2001,3, 4, 5 7 all the 2008's are $9.50 apiece. and then $35. so is $84, $83 for that set. you $20 per set. if i had 1000 of these runs i sell every one of them right here tonight. i do not.i had 200. actually 212 to be exact. i do not have to hundred 13. we will sell all 212 because you get all 10 of them with the original government packaging, the key to this is the original government packaging, less than $20 per set. $199.95. for me i think it is one of the most and collectable sets ever done by the u.s. government. these are- minted coins. the coins (...)do not confuse them with the coins you get at the bank or office. these only come in these sets. >>host: they were never in somebody's pocket. >>guest: these are presentation coins! when you take a coin like the georgia state quarter which is one of the rarest are nearly 1000 times more rare the regular issued coins. the regular issue george 1/4 of w
to north carolina to complete infantry training, and after that i went off to hawaii where i would be stationed for the next four years. this is where i also attended sniper school. so after attending sniper school, i quickly shipped off to iraq, and in iraq i didn't get to complete my tour because i was bitten on my right hand by a vicious enemy spider, and i actually suffered severe nerve damage, but i want to let everyone in this room know that the enemy will stop at nothing. they even train their spiders to bide us. [laughter] so i returned back home for trying to get my happened back, and this is where i became a sniper team leader in charge of five other marines. and we were out in mow salve i have -- mojave when my gunnery sergeant says we need five volunteers to go to afghanistan. and i said, what's the mission? he said we don't know yet, we just need five volunteers right now. i raised my hand and said, all right, i'm ready to go. so i ended up being signed to a small team of advisers, and we were going to act as advisers to the afghan national army. and this is different
through a bit of his life, explaining how he was in hawaii, in a foster home, orphanage, something similar to that and a bishop would come by monthly with each of the young children and say what can i do for you, young lady, young man and deap right away said i want a home. he explained how he went to live in the bishop's home raised by nuns and that went a long way to help danny appreciate and understand decency, working together in community, and it metropolitan a lot to him. and later then pearl harbor and he wanted to sign up and serve. but when he explained all this to us, he then mentioned how he stormed -- he was a very good shot, he was an excellent shot. he was a marksman. was a sharpshooter. and he recounted the first german he shot and killed in italy. and at that moment he was pretty proud of himself, very patriotic. i'm a good shot, i'm an american. i got that german. and after a while he engaged the enemy frequently and shot a few more germans and one time he was -- he stormed a tower, the machine gunner up in the tower and rushed up and because prior to that time one of the
there. just yesterday in my headquarters the deputy chief of the pla navy was in hawaii with -- at my headquarters receiving briefings on the future activities that our navies will do together, looking, talking through the issues, the rim of the pacific exercise which you mentioned that will happen in 2014. we have a growing ability to have a dialogue at the military level that's frank and open, and we do that through consultant talks that we do on a periodic basis. and then we build a calendar of events on the areas where we think we have the most opportunity to have success working together, we build that calendar of events. and so far we're having a very good record on meeting those objectives and actually completing them. right now i believe there is this this time frame i don't know exactly, but there's an hadr exercise that we are doing in a bilateral way between the u.s. military and pa-com and with the pla. so i've just sent letters to my counterparts congratulating them on their promotions and hoping that we continue to have a good and open dialogue. because in the end, it's,
. it was not until the mid-90s with hawaii that we talked about it in a serious way, and my friend, you know him well, evan wilson, was working on this, but when evan started working on this in the 1990s, people were like, gay marriage? that was in part because we were simply fighting to make it legal to have intimate relationships. i was a felon in the state of texas as i lived there. we can joke about that. i think, okay, not going to enforce the law. how will they catch me? for friends of mine going into law enforcement or education or the military or things like that, the sodomy laws were huge. >> host: it's been a huge change. >> guest: we were not talking about marriage, but it takes time, i think, to make this part of the culture, and not just in terms of the legal incidence. in terms of parents and grandparents saying, so when are you going to make it official? that takes time to build, and i think that that's something worth building for same-sex couples. >> host: one of the i things i remember thinking about, and you can talk about it better than i can, obviously, is how the fight for gay m
circumnavigation to james cook's death in hawaii, that is from 151-92-1759, mariners he went around the world did so in fear. it was reasonable for them to be fearful in the dangers of such a voyage in the age of sail. in mortality rates for circumnavigation routinely covered in the 70th percentile so a lot of people try to go around the world. the world simply shrugged most of them off so in this initial phase death prevailed in fear was the response. in the 1780s until the 1920s however travelers made their way around the world with a striking confidence that they could survive the experience. that was because it generated technologtechnolog y and political networks that seem to have conquered the globe. at this point it was not only possible to go-round the world that have become a popular pastime. representations of doing the circumnavigation became playful, enticing and even joyous. there were costs not all of them hidden that they seemed out weighed by the glories in making an easy swing around the planet. over the 20th century, and now into the early 21st century, the confidence has given
facilities on the island in hawaii. at 7:53 on sunday morning, december 7th. , 1941 without warning a japanese launched a massive air attack against pearl harbor and other military bases on that island. when the attack ended, almost 3,000 americans had lost their lives. a total of 21 ships were demolished. and 188 aircraft were destroyed. most of those aircraft were destroyed before they could become airborne. after the attack, president frack lynn -- franklin roosevelt stated that this day, december 7th is the day which we'll live in infa my. it has. we gather to remember that attack on pearl harbor and honor those who received the blow of that first strike. and also remember and honor all of those who served in world war ii. it's my pleasure today to represent the friends of the national world war ii memorial. an organization that is dedicated to ensuring that we always remember the greatest jen -- generation, and their service, valor and sacrifice. and all those supported on the home front. to achieve this we work closely and proudly with the national park service and with the de
was in hawaii with my headquarters receiving briefings on the future activities that our navies will do together, looking, talking through the issues of the rim of the pacific exercise of which you mentioned that will happen in 20 # 14. we have a growing ability to have a dialogue at the military level that's frank and open. we do that through consulted talks that we do on a periodic basis, and then we build a calendar of events on the areas where we think we'll have the most opportunity to have success working together. we build that calendar of events, and so far, we're having a very good record on meeting objectives and actually completing them. right now, i believe there's, in this time frame, there's exactly -- but there's an hdr exercise we're doing in a bilateral way between the u.s. military, paycom, and the pla. i just sent letters to my counterparts, congratlating them on their promotions, and hoping that we continue to have is a good and open dialogue. in the end, it's, you know, we have the responsibility, the pl organization and the u.s. military have a responsibility to have a good
are looking for a job this is a good one. you get to go to hawaii, you have to like food and you sit around and think of things you'd like to eat if you were on mars. there's also a 5,000-dollar fee you get paid as well. after all that, they think pizza would be good on mars. we have so many problems to rid entitlement spending, everything is out of control and they want to raise taxes. we have 160,000 petitions saying don't go back on your tax pledge. i agree wholeheartedly i plan on keeping my vote to kentucky and i will not vote to raise taxes. thank you. >> representative paul broun? >> i'm paul broun from georgia. i believe firmly we shouldn't raise taxes on anybody for any reason. the government has too much money. it's doing too much in a way of taking away our liberty. i believe in the constitutional limits to government as our founding of this. we have to stop the spending. we have to send power back to the states or the people is the tenth amendment says it should be. we can't balance the budget. we can stop this fiscal insanity that's going on here in washington without raising a
and all of danny's family, to the people of hawaii, and to all of those touched by this remarkable man. mr. president, i yield the floor. i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. 0. quorum call: mr. coats: i ask that the call of the role be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: mr. president, i have not yet filed but i plan to shortly ae an alternative amendt to the emergency supplemental, which is on the floor and in the process of being debated. i would like to explain what it is that i am going to file and what it does and explain the rationale behind it. mr. akaka: will the senator quelled for a a question? -- mr. leahy: will the senator yield for a question? mr. coats: i would be happy to yield. mr. leahy: it is ming that you are not going to -- it is my understanding that you are not going to seek action on it now, it is simply to file it? mr. coats: that is my intention. mr. leahy: thank you. mr. coats: the senator from vermont is correct. i don't intend to take any action on this now. i know there are events
of hawaii is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. eastern in the capitol rotunda. that's one of the reasons this hearing wrapped up early. following that the senator's body will lie in state in the rotunda until eight tonight. we will have that service live on c-span starting at 10 a.m. eastern. the u.s. senate will gavel in at 11 to recent consideration of h.r. one, the legislative vehicle for the supplemental spending bill by the areas affected by superstorm sandy. we will have live coverage of the senate here on c-span2. the pension benefit guarantee corporation director says without congressional changes the agency will end up with little resources failed improved pension plans or those plans until. he testified before the house education and the workforce subcommittee on pensions yesterday. we will show as much of this as possible into the senate else in at 11. >> -- senate gavels in at 11. >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> the subcommittee on health employment labor and pensions peions will come to order. good morning, director,
say so and so's said it was kenya he is born in hawaii you go on and stay as fact and what we believe to be true. there was a time when i think a lot of news outlets would report climate change skeptics with a kind of equal force with people are doing for climate change, and i think now when you see reports on the mainstream press their likely the overwhelming predominance of the scientific opinion is in favor of climate change or be leaving in climate change. the one thing, you know, there is nothing in this book to fault exactly, but the one thing i think that might get kind of underestimated in this book is the degree to which it is a conscious choice. our whole group of voters. if you look to the criticism that richard lugar made of richard murdock, and murdoch's defense of himself as it is the same thing. he said he doesn't want to legislate. he said i don't want to legislate. he said he would make the compromise necessary to get things done. murdoch said that's exactly what i want to do. if you let me i'm going to throw sand in the gear of government and prevent things from gett
is born in hawaii you go on and stay as fact and what we believe to be true. there was a time when i think a lot of news outlets would report climate change skeptics with a kind of equal force with people are doing for climate change, and i think now when you see reports on the mainstream press their likely the overwhelming predominance of the scientific opinion is in favor of climate change or be leaving in climate change. the one thing, you know, there is nothing in this book to fault exactly, but the one thing i think that might get kind of underestimated in this book is the degree to which it is a conscious choice. our whole group of voters. if you look to the criticism that richard lugar made of richard murdock, and murdoch's defense of himself as it is the same thing. he said he doesn't want to legislate. he said i don't want to legislate. he said he would make the compromise necessary to get things done. murdoch said that's exactly what i want to do. if you let me i'm going to throw sand in the gear of government and prevent things from getting done. i don't agree with that consensu
rd, hawaii and american university law schools. he's a member of the american academy of appellate lawyers and was its president from 1999-2000. he's a graduate of yale university and the harvard law school, served as a commissioned officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you, roger. i also have the distinction of two things. one, i read and commented on stuart and rick's book. i don't want to get any medal of honor for that. my name is in the acknowledgments, i found it today, so nobody's come after me yet. laugh and if you think it's insend yea -- incendiary now, you should have read the draft i read. [laughter] i'm one of the few lawyers who did not file a brief in the fisher case. [laughter] okay. so let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative action. the question in this case is did the university of texas violate the equal protection clause in connection with its undergraduate admission program, and did abigail fisher,
for the people of hawaii but wow, the way he stood up for federal work force, the civil servants who do such a great job, the outstanding job he's done on the veterans committee. lives are better off, particularly for our veterans, and i want to say a wonderful, wonderful goodbye and good hug to him, because he demonstrates that you don't have to be loud to be powerful. i also would like to pay tribute to someone on the other side of the aisle, my very good friend and someone i admire tremendously, senator dick lugar from indiana. who doesn't admire senator lugar? a judge, a scholar. i might even add, a rhodes scholar. a definite advocate for indiana. a very -- an incredible thought leader on foreign policy. ierm si'm so proud of him and tk deand the way he reached across the aisle to work with our colleague, senator sam nunn, on their famous nunn-lugar cooperative threat reduction program. they truly worked together to begin to end the threat of weapons of mass destruction in the former soviet union and made the world a better and safer place. we want to wish senator lugar a fond farew
. the president is going off to hawaii shortly. they maybe have two weeks left, and it's not the time to get through a complex policy issues because you will give them the short shrift. i think they should extend them for some time, whether that is when this the art expires. that gives them the more hard times when things, you know, hard deadlines when issues need to be addressed. i do think that there are these -- and i mentioned them. because we work together for so long, there are listed everywhere that i would. these are strongly agree to a bipartisan issues, raise the retirement age for medicare, reason for social security as well, and exit to longevity, take care of the cola. take care of reducing subsidies in medicare by further means testing premiums which exist today at a premium for part a. consolidate the premiums for all three of the programs. and then there is further means testing that could actually be done in social security through progressive indexing in things like that. those are things that have been talked about around town and the policy communities. you could do a bil
ask unanimous consent the tributes to danny inouye, late senator from hawaii, be printed as a senate document and that members have until 12:00 p.m. on tuesday, january 8, 2013, to submit said tributes. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mr. durbin: i ask unanimous consent when the senate completes its business today, it recess until 11:00 a.m. on monday, december 31, 2012. following the prayer and pledge, the journal of proceedings be approved to date and the time for the two leaders be reserved for their use later in the day, that following any leader remarks, the senate proceed to a period of morning business until 12:00 p.m. for debate only with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: if there is no further business to come before the senate, i ask that it recess under the previous order. the presiding officer: the senate stands in recess until 11:00 a.m.
in 1960, and it wasn't kenya, i'm sorry, it was in hawaii, they got married in hawaii and there were people in prison in this country for racial intermarriage. so just give you an idea of how much the country has changed in a good way. but right after richard nixon became president, for vacancies appeared on the supreme court. jimmy carter is the only president in american history but to the full term without a single they consider greater richard nixon was only president for five years and he had to leave early, remember? [applause] but he got four appointments to the supreme court. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger. blackmun, and william rehnquist. as a think about that list, has a very important part of the oath. but it is american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because moderate republicans dominated the supreme court moderate republicans are gone and the supreme court and the united stat
, a memorial service here at national cathedral. he will be returned to his home state hawaii on saturday and a public service will be held at national memorial cemetery in the pacific on sunday before he is laid to rest. >> identifies failure -- >> ahead of that republican, senator mccain, a out and grandpa holding a briefing of a new state department report on the benghazi consulate. >> ensure the safety of our fellow americans serving our nation overseas. it's a good start but it's only a start. a tragedy in benghazi raise a lot of other serious questions about our military, intelligence community, and perhaps most importantly, the administration so-called light footprint approach to libya and so many other challenges. they do not provide answers to these questions because it never asked them. it's essential defense department conducted similar independent and comprehensive accountability effort on the occasion of the worst terrorist attack in american history after repeated attacks on u.s. and western interests in benghazi. why were no, no, no. to assets or units posture, alert and re
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